Cocktail is a general purpose utility for OS X that lets you clean, repair and optimize your Mac. It is a powerful digital toolset that helps hundreds of thousands of Mac users around the world get the most out of their computers every day.

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Access hidden files or folders

Have you ever wanted to access a hidden file from an Open window or a hidden folder from a Save dialog?

You can easily toggle hidden files by hitting Command+Shift+Period in any dialog window.

 

Get "Save As..." shortcut in macOS

The "Save As..." keyboard shortcut allows you to quickly save a new version of an active document without re-writing the currently active document, which is perfect for many productivity situations where you'd want to save a current file as a different file type for compatibility reasons or as a backup version, or as a different copy in a new location.

"Save As..." used to be a default option in the File menu but now it's hidden by default. Not to worry, with a simple keyboard app shortcut you can regain the uber convenient "Save As..." option in the File menu.

• Open the  Apple menu and choose "System Preferences"
• Select "Keyboard" and then choose the "Shortcuts" tab
• Select "App Shortcuts" then press the + plus button to create a new shortcut for All Applications
• Set the following for the keyboard shortcut:
Application: All Applications
Menu Title: "Save As…"
Keyboard Shortcut: click into the field, then press Command + Shift + S
• Click "Add" to finish adding the "Save As..." keyboard shortcut and close out of System Preferences

The "Save As..." will now appear by default in the File menu of apps, and be available instantly as the Command + Shift + S keyboard shortcut. You can test this out yourself by going to any app that supports file saving and you'll find the File menu now includes the "Save As..." option by default, along with the keyboard shortcut.

The modern macOS default keyboard shortcut for "Save As..." is the finger twisting combo of Command + Option + Shift + S. All we're doing in this particular App Shortcut is to remap that complex keystroke into the familiar and easier to manage Command + Shift + S keystroke, which was the default in Mac OS for much of Mac history. This change may not be for everyone, but if you're a fan of using "Save As...", you'll undoubtedly appreciate knowing that you can get this great file saving feature back with a simple effort.

 

Safari downloads pane

Posted in Safari Tips & Tricks

Did you know that Safari downloads pane (which opens when you click on the button in the upper right corner) offers some interesting features?

• Double-click a file's icon open it
• Select a file and press Command+C to copy a file's URL
• Select a downloaded file and drag it to a folder, to your Desktop, or even to a Dock icon to launch it with that application

 

Apple Hardware Test

Apple Hardware Test (AHT) contains a suite of diagnostics that will test the hardware of your computer. It's a great way to rule out a hardware issue when troubleshooting your computer.

To start up your computer in AHT:

• Shut down your computer
• Press and hold the D key
• Press the power button to turn on your computer

Computers that shipped with OS X Mountain Lion (or later versions of OS X/macOS) support the use of AHT over the Internet. These computers will start up to an Internet-based version of AHT if the hard drive does not contain AHT. An Internet-enabled connection via Ethernet or Wi-Fi is required to use this feature. To start up to an Internet-based version of AHT:

• Shut down your computer
• Press and hold Option (Alt) and D
• Press the power button to turn on your computer

If the Apple Hardware Test indicates that the RAM memory is faulty you should be able to find instructions on how to replace it in your computer’s manual without voiding the warranty. However, if the problem is related to any other component the only option is usually to hand over the computer to Apple.

 

 

Set iCloud to save emails on your Mac

Posted in Mail Tips & Tricks

It’s certainly not unusual to want to store your data only on locations over which you have full control and not some company’s cloud, even if that’s Apple.

Apple’s Mail and most email clients on every platform and from every third party optimize their defaults settings around leaving mail on a server. That’s the modern way, where we can reach the same mail storage on any device, as well as through web mail.

However, it’s possible to avoid all this. You just have to change a view settings and rethink how you file mail once you’ve dealt with it. You can archive messages on a single Mac and store them there without leaving a copy on the server but you’d better be making backups, Time Machine or otherwise, or you’ll be sunk if your drive fails.

Your Inbox will always remain on the server. The Inbox is essentially a window into messages that have arrived and you haven’t processed. You make one change in settings and one change in behavior for everything else.

In Mail in macOS, follow these steps:

• Select Mail > Preferences and click Accounts.
• Select iCloud in the list at left.
• In the Account Information tab, set Download Attachments to All (the only reason to avoid this if you get frequent large attachments in messages you delete without needing those attachments).
• In the Mailbox Behaviors tab, for each mailbox popup menu, select a mailbox listed under On My Mac (if no mailbox exists, you need to create it from the Mailboxes sidebar).

Now all the standard Mail behavior will result in messages being downloaded or stored on your Mac.

On the behavior side, create all the mailboxes you need under the On My Mac section of the Mailboxes list, and then as you receive email in your Inbox, file those locally into those folders. That removes the messages from the mail server, leaving it stored only on your Mac.